Backpacking The Lost Coast Trail

COVID has funneled many of us outside. I was getting stir-crazy over summer last year, so I decided to do something about it. A few friends of mine told me they were going to backpack the 25-mile Lost Coast Trail in early fall — so after a week of research I asked if I could join them. They were happy to have me along, even if I did slow them down a bit. I wasn’t ready for the physical exertion that the trip promised (how was I to know?!) but they made sure I was geared up!

I was reminded earlier when reading about a woman who had been airlifted off the trail after being seriously injured. Then I read about a new 2.3-mile extension they built.

The Lost Coast Trail blew my mind away! We only spent four or five days hiking, but what an adventure it was! Parts of the trail disappear during high tide, which means you really need to pay attention to where you are and know the tiding schedule for that day. And even when the tide is out, sometimes the beach disappears in a sea of fog. It’s a foreign landscape I didn’t know existed here in the United States — but maybe I’ve just become accustomed to the LA desert.

The trail extends along the coastline in the King Range National Conservation Area. You might know it if you’ve ever gone through Humboldt County using Highway 1. That portion of the road is actually inland for about 90 miles without even touching the sea. It’s that rugged! And that’s what makes it a great nature experience, a great trail, and a challenging obstacle for novice backpackers — and I would definitely classify myself as a novice. 

Sound fun? It rained on us perpetually. I’d recommend going in June, July, August, or September when there is significantly less precipitation.